Danced on the Cross

This one screen shot inspired the title of the poem.
The video is a must see.



He danced on the cross
To the rhythm of the morbid
A macabre scene of celebration
We praise and rejoice to the gore
Of blood poured out for others
Human sacrifice
Just and right
Because He is God,
He can take it.

High, on top Incan pinnacles
Of the faithful to death
We called savages
Inhumane
Barbarians defined
By the practice of their hope
An after life.
They understood what it took.
What was necessary?
To appease god, God,
A sacrifice of blood
Over the table.
Pure and clean
As a baby’s heart.
An innocent deity’s heart.

She danced on the cross
Twirling, or was it twitching
Convulsing in the pain of loss
The shouts of hosanna ceasing
But even those who believed him
Quieted down,
Who would celebrate death?
Who in their right mind?
Jerking in excitement
Shaken earth underneath their feet.
Who would smile?
Cries of vic-
                      -to-
                             -ry?
There was no time
There was no place,
Not then, and why now?

I danced on the cross
His body was not there
Just the promise of return in glory
I danced on the cross
For my benefit, not His
I dared to dance on the cross
And feasted,
Patting myself on the back
for my luck.
Lucky Me!
And I dared to dance and define His death
And his dying
I danced and I pranced
And I dared to call myself apostle.
And I danced and I rejoiced
For the brethren who along with me felt as lucky as can be
And I danced I proclaimed to be
“Anointed to preach the good news to the poor”
Though my good news are just words
printed on cheap newsprint paper
Though my good news are accompanied
by raised hands that are empty
while my pocket and my car
and my 3 bedroom kingdom
keeps me enslaved 9 to 5.
Yet I dance!

I danced on the cross
That not only belongs to me
Belongs to me
Not at all
So dared I dance and raise barb wires
So that you don’t dare to dance
In the space I have decreed just for me.
Because I am holy.
Because I am a chosen saint.
Because I dare not to show wide open
What sin I hide from my own face.

I danced on the cross with joy
There where He laid for the world.

The "Lean In" Controversy

Because it is Spring Break for Seminarians at Drew, I have had the luxury of indulging in one of my vices;  watching TV.  This is a good week to watch TV: the Papal Conclave and Facebook CEO, Sheryl Sandberg’s book launch “Lean In.”

While I am having a lot of fun posting statements on Facebook about the conclave.  I am persuaded to briefly comment on the attention CEO Sandberg is getting on her book.  While the attention her book is getting is in part because she is one of the few 4.2% of women CEOs of Fortune 500 companies; the critics are not holding back.  Some of the flack she is getting it is because the approach she is suggesting seems to be received as elitist, as is coming from a place of power.  (I have not read the book yet) But, I too, am tempted to point out to all the reasons SHE in particular was able to rise to the top of the FB empire.

However, in listening to the side conversations that have risen as a result of her book, I want to thank CEO Sheryl Sandberg for writing her book.  To this day, I have yet to hear in mass media serious consideration and thoughtful conversations about women in the work place and in positions of boardroom leadership.  Yesterday, it was refreshing to hear a reporter say, “Please, let’s go beyond the question, Can women have it all?”  The female reporter challenged her panel that this viewpoint has been cyclical and unproductive. Yes! Agreed!

In working at Girl Scouts in leadership development programs for girls, I know some of what she is saying has some standing. So let’s not dismiss all of her “manifesto”.  Moreover, let’s keep the conversation going.  This is especially important while we witness a cloud of old men dressed in red garments make decisions on an institution that has 721,935 members in their women’s orders.  

In the mean time, let’s keep the conversation going and progressing, we owe it to our girls!

Links:

Today Show
NPR
LeanIn.org